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Blog from the archive - Beeswax wraps to Brazil. First published September 23 2018

Blog from the archive - Beeswax wraps to Brazil. First published September 23 2018

Although Swizzle and friends is mainly aimed at supplying the market in the UK with beeswax wraps, we have been dabbling in international waters recently.

It was a bit of surprise to get an order from Greece but it was duly dispatched, so hopefully, there is a satisfied customer somewhere between the Ionian Sea and the Aegean Sea, wrapping their food in beeswax wraps.

A possibly more exciting development was when contact was made from a student in Brazil who was keen to promote the benefits of beeswax wraps over plastic. So, we duly packed up some samples and got them in the post to Rio de Janeiro, with a request included to let us know how she gets on and to send some photos of her working with pupils in schools.

As it happens, my daughter has been studying Brazil in her geography lessons and among the information was the challenges faced by the country when it comes to pollution. It has been reported that it can be difficult to swim in some areas due to high levels of water pollution with floating rubbish and sewage causing some problems.

Elsewhere, the rising tide of plastic has caused some major problems including increasing the risk of flooding in some areas.

According to a report in the Guardian, Globally, some 2 billion people live in communities with no rubbish collections. While international attention has focused recently on the marine plastic litter crisis, the devastating impact of plastic waste on the world’s poorest is no less destructive, causing flooding, disease, and hundreds of thousands of premature deaths from toxic fumes caused by the burning of waste.

But some people are trying to tackle the problem and even though individually, it may seem to be too much to achieve, if many people do a bit, it soon turns into a lot.

To read the full Guardian article, visit https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/apr/12/the-brazilian-villagers-turning-plastic-pollution-into-profit